De l'utilité de la psychanalyse ...

Toutes discussions concernant l'autisme et le syndrome d'Asperger, leurs définitions, les méthodes de diagnostic, l'état de la recherche, les nouveautés, etc.
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Re: De l'utilité de la psychanalyse ...

#136 Message par isra » dimanche 12 janvier 2020 à 9:04

Très intéressante vidéo :bravo:

Le contenu permet de voir à quel point le système social est parasité par de fausses croyances qui ont hélas des répercussions dramatiques sur la vie de nombreuses familles, particulièrement les enfants et les mères, c’est affligeant!

Que des « experts-psychiatres » aient le pouvoir de pathologiser des personnes en leur collant des diagnostics qui ne sont pas reconnus scientifiquement et sans critères solides.

Et constater que le réseautage est plus puissant que la raison...
Diagnostiquée SA en janvier 2015

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Re: De l'utilité de la psychanalyse ...

#137 Message par freeshost » dimanche 12 janvier 2020 à 21:54

Encore ce maudit test de Rorschach !

Heureusement que la commune suisse est plus reluisante. Faudra que j'aille prendre des photos au bord du lac de Constance (Bodensee), face à l'Allemagne. :mrgreen: [Hermann Rorschach est mort à Herisau, capitale du canton d'Appenzell Rhodes-Extérieures, sises à vingt kilomètres de Rorschach. :lol: ]

Et cette psychanalyse encore bien présente en Suisse (certes pas autant qu'en France). [Il y a régulièrement des articles du quotidien francophone suisse LeTemps.Ch qui interrogent des psychanalystes.]
Pardon, humilité, humour, hasard, confiance, humanisme, partage, curiosité et diversité sont des gros piliers de la liberté et de la sérénité.

Diagnostiqué autiste en l'été 2014 :)

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Re: De l'utilité de la psychanalyse ...

#138 Message par freeshost » dimanche 12 janvier 2020 à 23:37

France is 50 years behind': the 'state scandal' of French autism treatment.
Spoiler : Quotation : 
A reliance on psychoanalysis sees autistic children going undiagnosed, being placed in psychiatric units and even being removed from their parents.

Like thousands of French children whose parents believe they have autism, Rachel’s six-year-old son had been placed by the state in a psychiatric hospital day unit. The team there, of the school of post-Freudian psychoanalysis, did not give a clear-cut diagnosis.

Rachel, who lived in a small village outside the alpine city of Grenoble, said she would go elsewhere to assess all three of her children. But the hospital called social services, who threatened to take the children away from her.

A consultant psychiatrist said Rachel was fabricating her children’s symptoms for attention, that they were not autistic, and that she wanted them to have autism spectrum disorder in order to make herself look more interesting.

Rachel’s children were taken and placed in care homes.

The children were subsequently diagnosed with autism and other issues, proving Rachel right. But despite a high-profile court battle in which parents’ groups denounced the “prehistoric vision of autism in France”, Rachel, who herself has Asperger syndrome, has still not won back custody of her children two years later. They remain in care with limited visiting rights. Local authorities insist the decision was correct.

“I’m condemned to stand by powerless at the loss of my family,” she wrote after their latest visit to her at Christmas, fearing her children had regressed in care. “I’m destroyed, my children are destroyed.”

The “Rachel affair”, entering another courtroom appeal battle this summer, has become a symbol of what parents’ groups call the “state scandal” of the treatment of autistic children in France. The crisis is so acute that the centrist French president Emmanuel Macron has deemed it an urgent “civilisational challenge”, promising a new autism action plan to be announced within weeks.

The United Nations stated in its most recent report that autistic children in France “continue to be subjected to widespread violations of their rights”. The French state has been forced to pay hundreds of thousands of euros in damages to families for inadequate care of autistic children in recent years.

The UN found that the majority of children with autism do not have access to mainstream education and many “are still offered inefficient psychoanalytical therapies, overmedication and placement in psychiatric hospitals and institutions”. Parents who oppose the institutionalisation of their children “are intimidated and threatened and, in some cases, lose custody of their children”.

Autism associations in France complain that autistic adults are shut away in hospitals, children face a lack of diagnosis and there is a persistence with a post-Freudian psychoanalytic approach that focuses not on education but on the autistic child’s unconscious feelings towards the mother.

A 2005 law guarantees every child the right to education in a mainstream school, but the Council of Europe has condemned France for not respecting it. Pressure groups estimate that only 20% of autistic children are in school, compared with 70% in England.

“France is 50 years behind on autism,” said Sophie Janois, Rachel’s lawyer. Her book, The Autists’ Cause, published this month, sets out to raise the alarm on the abuses of autistic people’s legal rights. “Parents are told: ‘Forget your child, grieve for your child and accept the fact that they will be put in an institution’.”

“Underlying this is a cultural problem in France,” Janois says. “France is the last bastion of psychoanalysis. In neighbouring countries, methods in education and behavioural therapies are the norm and psychoanalysis was abandoned a long time ago. In France, psychoanalysis continues to be applied to autistic children and taught in universities.”

She said parents were forced to fight a constant administrative battle for their children’s rights. “There are suicides of parents of autistic children … at least five in the last couple of years.”.

The row over post-Freudian psychoanalysis and autism in France has been bitter. Eighteen months ago, a group of deputies tried and failed to make parliament ban the use of psychoanalysis in the treatment of autistic children, claiming that the “outdated” view of autism as a child’s unconscious rejection of a cold, so-called “refrigerator” mother was denying children educational support.

Psychoanalysts, who have a powerful, leading role in French mental health care, criticised the campaign as “harmful” and defamatory.

In 2012, the French health authority stated that psychoanalysis was not recommended as an exclusive treatment method for autistic people because of a lack of consensus on its effectiveness. But most state hospitals still use the methods.

In addition, the United Nations warned in 2016 that a technique called “packing” – in which an autistic child is wrapped in cold, wet sheets – amounted to “ill-treatment” but had not been legally banned and was reportedly “still practised” on some children with autism. The then health minister issued a memo advising that the practice should stop.

Parents insist that excellent professionals are present in France, but they are few and in high demand, with services patchy and varying by area.

“I was told by local authorities: ‘Why are you insisting on school? Put him in an institution,’” said one mother near Tours of her high-functioning autistic seven-year-old who is now doing well academically. “In France, there is an autism of the poor, and the autism of the rich. If I didn’t have money and the skill to fight, my son would have ended up in psychiatric hospital.”

Catherine Chavy’s son Adrien is 20 years old. As a small child he was treated part-time at a state psychiatric hospital that used a psychoanalytical approach. His autism went undiagnosed for years. Chavy fought for a diagnosis and entry to primary school, later finding a centre that used educational and behavioural methods, where Adrien flourished. When he reached 15, there were no provisions at all. She privately organised permanent support for him at home. “He cooks, does sport, goes to his grandma’s for lunch. He has a lovely life, going out every day. If I hadn’t have done this on my own, I think he would be in an adult psychiatric hospital, tied up, on medication,” she said. “The situation in France is a health and education scandal.”

Pascale Millo set up an association for parents of autistic children in Corsica. She has a 14-year-old son, also called Adrien, with high-functioning autism and dyspraxia. The state put him in a psychiatric hospital day unit for years, but Millo didn’t get a diagnosis until he was nine. Adrien is academically strong but she has had to fight for his right, as someone with dyspraxia, to do all schoolwork on a computer, taking on the training and support herself, never sure whether, from one month to the next, lack of support in the education system will mean his studies are cut short. “In theory, France has everything: state finances, and laws to protect us,” she said. “But those laws are not being respected.”

Vincent Dennery, who heads a collective of autism associations, said he hoped for concrete, practical measures in Macron’s autism action plan, and a move from a medicalised approach towards education. “There are still thousands of autistic children in psychiatric hospital day units who have no reason to be there, but their parents can’t find any other solution,” he said.

Dennery said he felt society needed to shift. “Culturally, French society has been a place of exclusion. A large number of societies deinstitutionalised disability or difference and moved to include people in ordinary life, but France has not.”
Pardon, humilité, humour, hasard, confiance, humanisme, partage, curiosité et diversité sont des gros piliers de la liberté et de la sérénité.

Diagnostiqué autiste en l'été 2014 :)

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Re: De l'utilité de la psychanalyse ...

#139 Message par Siobhan » lundi 3 février 2020 à 8:34

Spoiler : 
freeshost a écrit :
dimanche 12 janvier 2020 à 23:37
France is 50 years behind': the 'state scandal' of French autism treatment.
Spoiler : Quotation : 
A reliance on psychoanalysis sees autistic children going undiagnosed, being placed in psychiatric units and even being removed from their parents.

Like thousands of French children whose parents believe they have autism, Rachel’s six-year-old son had been placed by the state in a psychiatric hospital day unit. The team there, of the school of post-Freudian psychoanalysis, did not give a clear-cut diagnosis.

Rachel, who lived in a small village outside the alpine city of Grenoble, said she would go elsewhere to assess all three of her children. But the hospital called social services, who threatened to take the children away from her.

A consultant psychiatrist said Rachel was fabricating her children’s symptoms for attention, that they were not autistic, and that she wanted them to have autism spectrum disorder in order to make herself look more interesting.

Rachel’s children were taken and placed in care homes.

The children were subsequently diagnosed with autism and other issues, proving Rachel right. But despite a high-profile court battle in which parents’ groups denounced the “prehistoric vision of autism in France”, Rachel, who herself has Asperger syndrome, has still not won back custody of her children two years later. They remain in care with limited visiting rights. Local authorities insist the decision was correct.

“I’m condemned to stand by powerless at the loss of my family,” she wrote after their latest visit to her at Christmas, fearing her children had regressed in care. “I’m destroyed, my children are destroyed.”

The “Rachel affair”, entering another courtroom appeal battle this summer, has become a symbol of what parents’ groups call the “state scandal” of the treatment of autistic children in France. The crisis is so acute that the centrist French president Emmanuel Macron has deemed it an urgent “civilisational challenge”, promising a new autism action plan to be announced within weeks.

The United Nations stated in its most recent report that autistic children in France “continue to be subjected to widespread violations of their rights”. The French state has been forced to pay hundreds of thousands of euros in damages to families for inadequate care of autistic children in recent years.

The UN found that the majority of children with autism do not have access to mainstream education and many “are still offered inefficient psychoanalytical therapies, overmedication and placement in psychiatric hospitals and institutions”. Parents who oppose the institutionalisation of their children “are intimidated and threatened and, in some cases, lose custody of their children”.

Autism associations in France complain that autistic adults are shut away in hospitals, children face a lack of diagnosis and there is a persistence with a post-Freudian psychoanalytic approach that focuses not on education but on the autistic child’s unconscious feelings towards the mother.

A 2005 law guarantees every child the right to education in a mainstream school, but the Council of Europe has condemned France for not respecting it. Pressure groups estimate that only 20% of autistic children are in school, compared with 70% in England.

“France is 50 years behind on autism,” said Sophie Janois, Rachel’s lawyer. Her book, The Autists’ Cause, published this month, sets out to raise the alarm on the abuses of autistic people’s legal rights. “Parents are told: ‘Forget your child, grieve for your child and accept the fact that they will be put in an institution’.”

“Underlying this is a cultural problem in France,” Janois says. “France is the last bastion of psychoanalysis. In neighbouring countries, methods in education and behavioural therapies are the norm and psychoanalysis was abandoned a long time ago. In France, psychoanalysis continues to be applied to autistic children and taught in universities.”

She said parents were forced to fight a constant administrative battle for their children’s rights. “There are suicides of parents of autistic children … at least five in the last couple of years.”.

The row over post-Freudian psychoanalysis and autism in France has been bitter. Eighteen months ago, a group of deputies tried and failed to make parliament ban the use of psychoanalysis in the treatment of autistic children, claiming that the “outdated” view of autism as a child’s unconscious rejection of a cold, so-called “refrigerator” mother was denying children educational support.

Psychoanalysts, who have a powerful, leading role in French mental health care, criticised the campaign as “harmful” and defamatory.

In 2012, the French health authority stated that psychoanalysis was not recommended as an exclusive treatment method for autistic people because of a lack of consensus on its effectiveness. But most state hospitals still use the methods.

In addition, the United Nations warned in 2016 that a technique called “packing” – in which an autistic child is wrapped in cold, wet sheets – amounted to “ill-treatment” but had not been legally banned and was reportedly “still practised” on some children with autism. The then health minister issued a memo advising that the practice should stop.

Parents insist that excellent professionals are present in France, but they are few and in high demand, with services patchy and varying by area.

“I was told by local authorities: ‘Why are you insisting on school? Put him in an institution,’” said one mother near Tours of her high-functioning autistic seven-year-old who is now doing well academically. “In France, there is an autism of the poor, and the autism of the rich. If I didn’t have money and the skill to fight, my son would have ended up in psychiatric hospital.”

Catherine Chavy’s son Adrien is 20 years old. As a small child he was treated part-time at a state psychiatric hospital that used a psychoanalytical approach. His autism went undiagnosed for years. Chavy fought for a diagnosis and entry to primary school, later finding a centre that used educational and behavioural methods, where Adrien flourished. When he reached 15, there were no provisions at all. She privately organised permanent support for him at home. “He cooks, does sport, goes to his grandma’s for lunch. He has a lovely life, going out every day. If I hadn’t have done this on my own, I think he would be in an adult psychiatric hospital, tied up, on medication,” she said. “The situation in France is a health and education scandal.”

Pascale Millo set up an association for parents of autistic children in Corsica. She has a 14-year-old son, also called Adrien, with high-functioning autism and dyspraxia. The state put him in a psychiatric hospital day unit for years, but Millo didn’t get a diagnosis until he was nine. Adrien is academically strong but she has had to fight for his right, as someone with dyspraxia, to do all schoolwork on a computer, taking on the training and support herself, never sure whether, from one month to the next, lack of support in the education system will mean his studies are cut short. “In theory, France has everything: state finances, and laws to protect us,” she said. “But those laws are not being respected.”

Vincent Dennery, who heads a collective of autism associations, said he hoped for concrete, practical measures in Macron’s autism action plan, and a move from a medicalised approach towards education. “There are still thousands of autistic children in psychiatric hospital day units who have no reason to be there, but their parents can’t find any other solution,” he said.

Dennery said he felt society needed to shift. “Culturally, French society has been a place of exclusion. A large number of societies deinstitutionalised disability or difference and moved to include people in ordinary life, but France has not.”
Pour rebondir sur la désinstitutionnalisation dans d'autres pays, j'ai lu récemment (Dans le brillant "Try to Remember: Psychiatry's Clash over Meaning, Memory, and Mind" du psychiatre américain Paul McHugh) qu'aux Etats-Unis, le début du mouvement de désinstitutionnalisation des handicaps date au moins du président Kennedy, en 1963 je crois avec le Community Mental Health Act of 1963 (en anglais).
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Re: De l'utilité de la psychanalyse ...

#140 Message par Tugdual » mercredi 15 avril 2020 à 9:11

Sur le blog de Franck Ramus :
Extrait :
Conclusions

L’analyse de la composition de la section 16 et des demandes de qualification PR convergent pour suggérer que les enseignants-chercheurs en psychologie clinique en poste actuellement sont en majorité (environ 60%) d’orientation psychanalytique.

L’analyse des postes ouverts au concours en 2020 suggère un équilibre similaire. Autrement dit, les recrutements effectués cette année vont préserver la prépondérance de la psychanalyse au sein des différentes approches de la psychologie clinique.

Une seule donnée s’écarte de ce constat : les demandes de qualifications au grade de MCF en psychologie clinique sont majoritairement dans les orientations non psychanalytiques. Il n’est pas clair à ce stade s’il s’agit d’une tendance durable, ni quelles en sont les explications. Néanmoins, on ne peut que constater qu’il y a cette année un déséquilibre entre l’offre de postes de MCF en psychologie clinique (majoritairement psychanalytique), et la demande de la part des jeunes docteurs (majoritairement non psychanalytique).

Au final, les données factuelles disponibles suggèrent que la psychanalyse reste dominante au sein de la psychologie clinique dans les universités françaises, et ne semble pas en voie de disparition.
TCS = trouble de la communication sociale (24/09/2014).

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Re: De l'utilité de la psychanalyse ...

#141 Message par Tugdual » mercredi 18 novembre 2020 à 13:19

Seconde partie :
Extrait :
Conclusions

La psychanalyse est fortement présente dans les masters de psychologie français. C’est l’approche dominante (60%) dans les parcours de psychologie clinique, mais elle est également fortement représentée dans les parcours de psychologie de la santé (45%), de psychologie du développement et de l’éducation (36%), et de psychologie sociale (29%).

Au sein des parcours de psychologie clinique, la psychanalyse occupe 2 fois plus de place que les TCC, et 3 fois plus de place que les thérapies systémiques. Les autres approches ne sont représentées que de manière marginale.

Enfin, la psychanalyse est l’approche qui est le plus souvent enseignée de manière exclusive, et le moins souvent enseignée conjointement avec d’autres orientations.

Ce travail de cotation confirme également le manque de transparence d'un bon nombre d'universités vis-à-vis des approches qui sont enseignées dans leurs formations. Les maquettes, pourtant censées présenter les parcours, manquent souvent d'informations essentielles sur leur contenu. Ce manque de transparence peut empêcher les étudiants de s'orienter dans le parcours qui leur paraît le plus pertinent. Au niveau méthodologique, cela restreint aussi la portée de nos résultats, certains masters ne pouvant être identifiés comme relevant d'une approche plutôt que d'une autre. C'est une des limites de ce travail.

Une telle analyse n’ayant jamais été réalisée auparavant, il est impossible d’estimer la tendance par rapport au passé. Les prochaines mises à jour de cette analyse permettront de suivre les évolutions futures.
TCS = trouble de la communication sociale (24/09/2014).

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Re: De l'utilité de la psychanalyse ...

#142 Message par Jean » mercredi 9 décembre 2020 à 18:32

La fin sans fin de l’illusion psychanalytique – à partir de l’ouvrage de Jacques Van Rillaer, Freud et Lacan, des charlatans ? Faits et légendes de la psychanalyse

A partir du dernier ouvrage de Jacques Van Rillaer, "Freud et Lacan, des charlatans ? Faits et légendes de la psychanalyse", une analyse du statut actuel de la psychanalyse.
Bruxelles, Mardaga, 2019, 276 p.
https://blogs.mediapart.fr/jean-vincot/ ... an-rillaer
Freud et Lacan.png
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Re: Articles divers sur les TSA

#143 Message par Jean » mardi 29 décembre 2020 à 19:04

Modération (Tugdual) : Déplacement de messages depuis ici (début).


La psychanalyse dans le traitement de l'autisme : pourquoi la France a-t-elle une culture aberrante ?

Qu'est-ce qui explique que la psychanalyse soit encore mise en œuvre dans l'autisme en France ? Quelles sont les conséquences de cette survivance dans la vision des mères et dans celle de la pédophilie ?

cambridge.org Traduction de "Psychoanalysis in the treatment of autism: why is France a cultural outlier? | BJPsych Bulletin | Cambridge Core" Publié en ligne par Cambridge University Press: 17 Décembre 2020 - D. V. M. Bishop et Joel Swendsen
https://blogs.mediapart.fr/jean-vincot/ ... -aberrante
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Re: Articles divers sur les TSA

#144 Message par Curiouser » mardi 29 décembre 2020 à 19:15

Un très bon article récapitulatif sur le poids de la psychanalyse en France. Merci Jean.


Modération (Tugdual) : Déplacement de messages depuis ici (fin).
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Conjoint diagnostiqué TSA en octobre 2020.

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Re: De l'utilité de la psychanalyse ...

#145 Message par Tugdual » lundi 4 janvier 2021 à 10:27

Psychomedia en parle aussi :
Extrait :
« "La question clé, écrivent-ils, n'est plus de savoir comment la France est arrivée à ce point, mais plutôt comment elle ne semble pas pouvoir le dépasser complètement." »

« "Si la psychanalyse est aujourd'hui marginale en France pour l'ensemble de la psychiatrie, il en va autrement pour la sous-discipline de la pédopsychiatrie qui a été dominée par cette orientation pendant des décennies" ».
[...]
« "Même si les nouvelles générations de médecins sont formées à des traitements fondés sur des données probantes, les générations plus anciennes qui ont été formées à considérer la psychanalyse comme un traitement viable de l'autisme pratiquent toujours. Cette présence est visible à tous les niveaux du système de santé français, y compris dans les hôpitaux publics, les cliniques et les cabinets privés." »

Mais, estiment-ils, « "le plus grand problème en France concerne peut-être la formation des psychologues cliniciens. Les psychologues sont dix fois plus nombreux que les psychiatres et ils occupent un grand nombre de postes dans les cliniques et les hôpitaux traitant des enfants autistes." »

Selon une analyse réalisée par Joel Swendsen (2018), sur 26 universités françaises chargées de la formation des psychologues cliniciens, « "la moitié dispensent encore une formation psychanalytique substantielle. Dans neuf de ces universités, la formation dispensée en psychologie clinique est exclusivement d'orientation psychanalytique." »

« "Les cliniciens formés dans ces établissements ne sont pas systématiquement exposés à des approches fondées sur des données probantes dans le traitement de l'autisme (ou d'autres troubles mentaux, d'ailleurs), et aucun examen national ou critère d'autorisation professionnelle ne les oblige à suivre une telle formation avant d'occuper des postes dans les hôpitaux de tout le pays." »

« "Le gouvernement français et les présidents des universités ont fermé les yeux sur ce monopole psychanalytique dans les établissements d'enseignement supérieur." »
[...]
Notons que dans les trois grands classements internationaux des universités en psychologie, les universités françaises sont extraordinairement à la traîne.
TCS = trouble de la communication sociale (24/09/2014).

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