Liste de lieux compatibles autistes (autism friendly)

Toutes discussions concernant l'autisme et le syndrome d'Asperger, leurs définitions, les méthodes de diagnostic, l'état de la recherche, les nouveautés, etc.
Message
Auteur
Avatar du membre
Lilas
Modératrice
Messages : 3517
Enregistré le : dimanche 14 juillet 2013 à 12:17
Contact :

Re: Liste de lieux compatibles autistes (autism friendly)

#46 Message par Lilas » lundi 29 mai 2017 à 20:42

Je t'ai volé ta version 3 pour l'envoyer aux participants de la rencontre parisienne de samedi.
Lilas - TSA (AHN)

"Je suis sur la terre comme dans une planète étrangère où je serais tombé de celle que j’habitais" - Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Avatar du membre
freeshost
Forcené
Messages : 26732
Enregistré le : lundi 15 juillet 2013 à 15:09
Localisation : CH

Re: Liste de lieux compatibles autistes (autism friendly)

#47 Message par freeshost » mardi 30 mai 2017 à 14:00

Moi aussi, je suis un voleur. [Page 5] :mrgreen:
Pardon, humilité, humour, hasard, confiance, humanisme, partage, curiosité et diversité sont des gros piliers de la liberté et de la sérénité.

- Ah ! j'ai été diagnostiqué Asperger Haut Potentiel à Cery (CH) en l'été 2014, mais tu le savais. :)

Avatar du membre
freeshost
Forcené
Messages : 26732
Enregistré le : lundi 15 juillet 2013 à 15:09
Localisation : CH

Re: Liste de lieux compatibles autistes (autism friendly)

#48 Message par freeshost » dimanche 18 juin 2017 à 17:15

Mise à jour ! ( Questionnaire_Evaluation_Lieux_Adaptation_Autisme_006.pdf )

Changement : ajout d'une case "En cours de diagnostic".
Pardon, humilité, humour, hasard, confiance, humanisme, partage, curiosité et diversité sont des gros piliers de la liberté et de la sérénité.

- Ah ! j'ai été diagnostiqué Asperger Haut Potentiel à Cery (CH) en l'été 2014, mais tu le savais. :)

Avatar du membre
freeshost
Forcené
Messages : 26732
Enregistré le : lundi 15 juillet 2013 à 15:09
Localisation : CH

Re: Liste de lieux compatibles autistes (autism friendly)

#49 Message par freeshost » lundi 30 juillet 2018 à 16:02

U.K. Supermarket to Have ‘Quieter Hour’ for [url=https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/201 ... utism.html]People With Autism.[/url]
Dim the lights. Silence the piped-in music. Turn down the checkout beeps. For an hour on Saturdays, a British supermarket chain is introducing a weekly “quieter hour” aimed at helping people with autism have a better shopping experience by easing sensory overload.

The move by the supermarket, Morrisons, which begins on Saturday and runs from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m., has been welcomed by the National Autistic Society, which says that even small changes can make a big difference in the lives of people with autism and their families.

“Around 700,000 people are on the autism spectrum in the U.K.,” Tom Purser, of the National Autistic Society, said in an email. “This means they see, hear and feel the world differently to other people, often in a more intense way, which can make shopping a real struggle.”

Autism is a lifelong developmental disability that affects how people communicate and relate to others and how they experience the world around them. More than 60 percent of people with autism avoid shops, and 79 percent say they feel socially isolated, according to figures published by the society.

Morrisons’s effort is part of the National Autistic Society’s “Too Much Information” campaign: Last year, more than 5,000 retailers across Britain participated in “Autism Hour.” The society hopes to expand the initiative.

Morrisons, the fourth-largest supermarket chain in Britain, said in a statement on its website, “Listening to customers, we found that one in five had a friend or family member with autism and many liked the idea of being able to shop in more comfort at 9-10 a.m. on a Saturday.”

In the statement, Angela Gray, part of a community group that builds ties with the supermarket, is quoted as saying: “I was involved in the initial trial as my son is autistic, and we found that these changes made a real difference. The trial showed there is a need for a quieter shopping experience for some customers.”

Lisa Chudley, of Wandsworth in South London, received a diagnosis of autism for her son, Max, when he was 7. During a grocery run last summer, Max fell to the floor, covered his ears and started to shake uncontrollably.

Like many people with autism, Max, now 13, was struggling to cope with the bright lights, loud noises and crowds associated with shopping at a large supermarket on a weekend, she said in an interview.

“We just avoid the shops, especially at peak times,” said Ms. Chudley, who usually does her shopping online but made an exception that weekend because there were no available delivery slots.

“What can already be an overwhelming experience for your average person is 10 times as chaotic for Max, who feels things much more intensely than we do,” Ms. Chudley said. “Some shopping environments can be torture for autistic children.”

Shopping can be equally stressful for adults with autism. Billie Jade, a 21-year-old from Derbyshire, England, who blogs about her condition, says she tries to avoid big stores as much as possible.

“I will sometimes go to a supermarket to pick up ingredients for baking,” she wrote in a post. “I will make sure that before I enter the shop I have saved photos on my phone of exactly what I am looking for so that I can get in and out as fast as I can.”

“Squeezing through trolleys of people chatting noisily amongst a mixture of offensive smells is not a pleasant experience for me,” she added. “On top of this, I find the product placement confusing and often can’t locate what I need.”

Instead of approaching staff members for assistance, Ms. Jade said, she would often panic and leave the shop empty-handed.

Movie theaters in Britain have also introduced similar initiatives, hosting “autism-friendly screenings” by reducing stimulation and sound.

“These kinds of resources allow autistic people to participate and engage with the world instead of run away from it,” Ms. Chudley said. “It breaks them free from social isolation.”

Late last year, amid the crush and chaos of the holiday shopping season, a Target in Framingham, Mass., offered “sensory-friendly shopping hours,” according to local news reports. For three hours on a Sunday in December, the store cut off the music, dimmed some lights, minimized flashing electronic screens and created a quiet corner for customers.

In October, many large supermarket chains across Britain, such as Asda and Tesco, plan to take part in a week of “quieter hours.”
Ça vous dirait que des commerces divers offrent des heures sans musique, avec moins de lumière, durant la semaine ? :mrgreen:
Pardon, humilité, humour, hasard, confiance, humanisme, partage, curiosité et diversité sont des gros piliers de la liberté et de la sérénité.

- Ah ! j'ai été diagnostiqué Asperger Haut Potentiel à Cery (CH) en l'été 2014, mais tu le savais. :)

Avatar du membre
freeshost
Forcené
Messages : 26732
Enregistré le : lundi 15 juillet 2013 à 15:09
Localisation : CH

Re: Liste de lieux compatibles autistes (autism friendly)

#50 Message par freeshost » vendredi 21 septembre 2018 à 0:02

Autism friendly activities in London : Things to do for autistic children and adults
The UK population has one of the highest rates of autism anywhere in the world and it’s estimated that around 2.8m people are affected every day.

Thankfully London is an incredibly accommodating city with a host of theatres, museums and event spaces offering relaxed, fun experiences for children and families to enjoy together.

From theatre trips to museums and cinemas, these are some of the most autism-friendly things to do in the city.

Theatre

Sometimes the theatre can seem an intimidating space for any family to tackle. There are plenty of venues making great efforts to include autistic audience members though and relaxed performances can be a fantastic way to take pressure off the experience.

These special events often see venues raise the house lights to create a less intense atmosphere, adopt a more casual approach to theatre etiquette and often provide chill-out areas for families to relax in.

The Lyceum Theatre is well known for its relaxed performances of the Lion King. The venue collaborates with The National Autistic Society for the events and trained staff are always happy to help out.

Shakespeare’s Globe is also making great efforts to be more accessible with its 2018 season, with a total of eight productions putting on relaxed performances between April and October.

Museums

London’s museums are some of the best in the world and an increasing number are making experiences more comfortable for people with autism. Kensington institutions the Natural History Museum and the Science Museum are two such organisations putting on fantastic events aimed at bringing experiences to life for children. The free and interactive Dawnasaurs events at the Natural History Museum feature a sensory room and quiet space for maximum comfort, while the Early Bird and Night Owls events at the Science Museum allow families to enjoy workshops at off-peak times.

Families with autistic members can request fast-track access to beat the queues at the Tower Of London. The Hands of History exhibition on the top floor of the historic setting also offers an opportunity for families to learn through play.

If you're in the centre of town the National Autistic Society recommends the London Transport Museum in Covent Garden as a great interactive experience, while the Royal Air Force Museum also offers an Autism-friendly trail.

Events and things to do

Families looking to plan a sightseeing trip in the city can rest assured the London Eye will do all they can to accommodate them. The attraction offers discounted rates to guests with disabilities and even lit up pink for World Autism Awareness Day in recognition of their efforts to increase accessibility.

Trips to London cinemas are easier than ever too thanks to the likes of Odeon, Vue and Cineworld, who put on special screenings one Sunday morning every month. Much like relaxed theatre performances the house lights are kept on during screenings to create a less intense atmosphere. The film’s sound effects are also toned down and the audience is told to expect higher background noise as families enjoy the movie.

Finally, The Gate in Islington has a great reputation for their accommodation and was recognised as London’s first ‘autism friendly’ restaurant back in 2016 by the National Autistic Society. It’s another good option for families looking to organise events in one of the most accommodating cities around.
Pardon, humilité, humour, hasard, confiance, humanisme, partage, curiosité et diversité sont des gros piliers de la liberté et de la sérénité.

- Ah ! j'ai été diagnostiqué Asperger Haut Potentiel à Cery (CH) en l'été 2014, mais tu le savais. :)

Avatar du membre
Artelise
Fidèle
Messages : 176
Enregistré le : jeudi 22 mars 2018 à 16:13
Localisation : Graz, autriche.
Contact :

Re: Liste de lieux compatibles autistes (autism friendly)

#51 Message par Artelise » vendredi 21 septembre 2018 à 12:10

Ce matin, j'ai constaté que mon hypermarché favori ne diffusait pas la moindre musique.
J'en était à la moitié de mes achats lorsque je l'ai constaté. Je me trouvais tout simplement plus efficace, moins indécise dans mes décisions, moins stressée. C'est alors que j'ai réalisé qu'il n'y avait rien en fond sonore. Juste des conversations, ici ou là, des autres clients et le bruit de déplacement des employés du magasins qui géraient les rayons.

Au moment de passer en caisse, la caissière ma sourit et elle m'a dit :"Es ist viel besser ohne Musik, oder?" ("c'est mieux sans musique, n'est-ce pas ?") Et elle m'a fait un clin d'oeil.
(pour la petite histoire, il faut savoir que c'est ma caissière favorite depuis près de 10 ans et que nous nous sommes croisées, totalement par hasard, dans la salle d'attente de la psychologue qui a établi le diagnostic de mon fils... )

Et ouais, c'est radicalement mieux sans musique ! et les personnes âgées qui étaient là en même temps que moi semblaient tout à fait d'accord.
Comme quoi pour le coup, réduire les stimulations dans un grand magasin ne profiterait pas qu'aux Autistes.

:bravo: au Merkur du Shopping City Seiersberg (Autriche).
---------------------------------------
Maman "Asperger" d'un petit garçon et d'une petite fille tout deux diagnostiqués "Asperger".
:roll:

Avatar du membre
freeshost
Forcené
Messages : 26732
Enregistré le : lundi 15 juillet 2013 à 15:09
Localisation : CH

Re: Liste de lieux compatibles autistes (autism friendly)

#52 Message par freeshost » vendredi 21 septembre 2018 à 20:33

Weiss sie, das du auf dem autistischen Spektrum bist ?
Sait-elle que tu es sur le spectre autistique ?

:mrgreen:
Pardon, humilité, humour, hasard, confiance, humanisme, partage, curiosité et diversité sont des gros piliers de la liberté et de la sérénité.

- Ah ! j'ai été diagnostiqué Asperger Haut Potentiel à Cery (CH) en l'été 2014, mais tu le savais. :)

Avatar du membre
Artelise
Fidèle
Messages : 176
Enregistré le : jeudi 22 mars 2018 à 16:13
Localisation : Graz, autriche.
Contact :

Re: Liste de lieux compatibles autistes (autism friendly)

#53 Message par Artelise » samedi 22 septembre 2018 à 14:30

freeshost a écrit :
vendredi 21 septembre 2018 à 20:33
Weiss sie, das du auf dem autistischen Spektrum bist ?
Sait-elle que tu es sur le spectre autistique ?

:mrgreen:
Elle doit au moins avoir de sérieux doutes. ;)
Il est possible que je laisse plus d'indices que je ne le pense.
Ma façon de parcourir le magasin toujours le même jour de la semaine, toujours de la même façon ; ma façon de remplir mes sacs de courses selon la même procédure ; le fait que je pense à dire "bonjour" (ou son équivalent) avant de lever les yeux pour croiser le regard de mon interlocuteur en me disant "ah oui, il faut regarder les gens quand on dit ça". :mryellow:

Pour peu qu'elle ait connaissance de la façon dont le TSA peu impacter la vie des gens (après tout j'ignore pour quelle raison elle accompagnait son fils chez la psy en question), elle a très bien pu tirer quelques conclusions.
Ce qui, d'ailleurs, m'amène à penser que l'éventualité que je fasse partie du spectre est peut-être plus réelle que je ne voudrais l'admettre.
---------------------------------------
Maman "Asperger" d'un petit garçon et d'une petite fille tout deux diagnostiqués "Asperger".
:roll:

Avatar du membre
freeshost
Forcené
Messages : 26732
Enregistré le : lundi 15 juillet 2013 à 15:09
Localisation : CH

Re: Liste de lieux compatibles autistes (autism friendly)

#54 Message par freeshost » samedi 22 septembre 2018 à 17:13

Un petit processus de diagnostic pour toi aussi ? :mrgreen:

Ich habe Österreich noch nicht besucht.
Je n'ai pas encore visité l'Autriche.
Pardon, humilité, humour, hasard, confiance, humanisme, partage, curiosité et diversité sont des gros piliers de la liberté et de la sérénité.

- Ah ! j'ai été diagnostiqué Asperger Haut Potentiel à Cery (CH) en l'été 2014, mais tu le savais. :)

Répondre